HistoryWired About the Program Help Comments Smithsonian Institution
Back to Map

Enlarge
Related Images

Martin Luther King provides support to Ralph

Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968)
Audio

"I Hope We’ll Meet Again"
From the "Nashville Sit-in Story"
© Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Audio

"You Better Leave Segregation Alone"
From the "Nashville Sit-in Story"
© Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

MLK and the Montgomery Story
1960s

"How 50,000 Negroes found a new way to end racial discrimination"
This booklet tells how local Baptist pastor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. helped overturn racial segregation in the Montgomery, Alabama, bus system. Published by the Fellowship of Reconciliation and sold for 10 cents, it presents King's story as an example of how to "practice the things that Jesus taught about overcoming evil with good." On December 1, 1955, an African-American woman named Rosa Parks who refused to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger was arrested for violating the city's segregation law. African American activists formed the Montgomery Improvement Association to boycott the transit system. They chose as their leader the Reverend King. In his first speech to the group, King declared:

"We have no alternative but to protest. For many years we have shown an amazing patience. We have sometimes given our white brothers the feeling that we liked the way we were being treated. But we come here tonight to be saved from that patience that makes us patient with anything less than freedom and justice."

Just over a year later, the African Americans of Montgomery achieved their goal of desegregation of the city's buses.

Notes
Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968)
Web display only

Learn more!
· Jim Crow System
· Civil Rights Movement
· Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, August 28, 1963
· "I Hope We’ll Meet Again"
· "You Better Leave Segregation Alone"

What do you think?
Would you like to see more objects like this on the site? Tell others by casting your vote.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Fewer More


Start HistoryWired | About the Program | Help | Comments

Smithsonian Institution | Terms of Use | Privacy