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ENIAC designer J. Presper Eckert in front of the iniator panel
 

The ENIAC Computer
1945

The machine that launched the computer industry
The ENIAC was a large, general-purpose digital computer built to compute ballistics tables for U.S. Army artillery during World War II. Occupying a room 30 feet by 50 feet, ENIAC--the Electrical Numerical Integrator and Computer--weighed 30 tons and used some 18,000 vacuum tubes. It could compute 1,000 times faster than any existing device. Technicians used external plug wires, like those shown here, to program the machine.

Notes
Principal designers, J. Presper Eckert and John Mauchley
Built between July 1943 and fall 1945
Cost, about $400,000

Learn more!
· Computer History Collection, NMAH
· Original Press Release 1 for ENIAC Computer, February 16, 1946, NMAH Computer History Collection

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