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Dr. John Hooper's Female Pills
1750s

"for young women, when afflicted with what is commonly called the irregularities"
In 1743, King George II granted the original patent for these pills to Dr. John Hooper of Reading, England. Hooper shrewdly revealed little of his formula to the public. He stated only that the pills were composed of "the best purging stomatick and anti-hysterick ingredients." By the 1750s, Hooper's Female Pills appeared frequently in the advertisements of colonial apothecaries. "They are the best medicine ever discovered for young women, when afflicted with what is commonly called the irregularities," Hooper claimed, "and are also excellent for the palpitations of the heart, giddiness, loathing of food...a dejected countenance, a dislike to exercise and conversation, and likewise for the scurvy." Hooper promised more. His pills could be taken by women after childbirth to "purge off those gross humours which when retained generate numerous diseases, and render women unhappy all their lives" and during menopause "to prevent those disorders that usually attend them at this time."

Notes
Box dimensions, 2.5" x 1.2" x 0.83"
Hooper's pills were seized by government agents between 1919-1923 after the passage of the Pure Foods and Drugs Act of 1906. No one came forward in court to support the pills' claims as the sure cure "in all hypochondriac, hysterick or vapourish disorders."
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