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Women's suffrage protest in front of the White House, February 1917
 
Audio

"Let Us All Speak Our Minds" From Elizabeth Knight: Songs of the Suffragettes
© Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Audio

"Give the Ballot to the Mothers"
From Elizabeth Knight: Songs of the Suffragettes
© Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Suffragette Badge
1915

"Votes for women, 1915"
So declares this pennant-shaped badge, owned by a supporter of woman suffrage from the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. By 1915, the woman suffrage movement had been campaigning for decades for the right of women to vote. Two years later, the United States entered World War I. Passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920 granted women the right to vote in national elections.

Notes
Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919 and ratified on August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment states that the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex and that Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
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Learn more!
· The Right to Vote
· Women's Suffrage Movement
· "Tea and Sisterhood" by Valerie Jablow, "Smithsonian" magazine, October 1998
· "Let Us All Speak Our Minds," from Elizabeth Knight: Songs of the Suffragettes
· "Give the Ballot to the Mothers," from Elizabeth Knight: Songs of the Suffragettes

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